add_filter('vc_grid_get_grid_data_access','__return_true'); ?> Do I need planning permission or building regulations? - Kingmoor Consulting

Do I need planning permission is a question we get asked all the time.  As consulting engineers, some of the aspects of our domestic and commercial work fall into some grey areas of planing permissions and building regulations requirements.

Therefore we have attempted to put together a comprehensive guide to the planning and building regulations associated with the typical requirements for work in a domestic or commercial property.

Please follow the links below for the type of work which you may be undertaking.

 

 

 

 

 

Item

Planning Permissions

Building Regulations

Adverts and Signs

Planning Permission is not normally required for a small sign, for instance with your house name or number on it. You may need to apply for advertisement consent to display an advertisement bigger than 0.3 square metres, however, and the planning regime for larger, professional adverts, signs for businesses and so on is complex.

 

Domestic adverts and signs are not normally subject to building control though, if lit, any electrical work would be. In all cases they must ‘be kept in a safe condition’.

 

Air Source Heat Pump

The planning regime covering air source heat pumps is currently being revised. Installing an air source heat pump will become permitted development as soon as standards and safeguards have been established to deal with noise.

Until then planning permission may be necessary and you are advised to contact your local planning authority for guidance.

If you live in a listed building or a conservation area you should also contact your council to check on local policy.

 

Building Regulations normally apply to installing an air source heat pump.

It is advisable to contact an engineer who can provide the necessary advice.

Bathroom

is not normally required for maintenance/ replacement of bathrooms though if you live in a listed building you should check with your Local Planning Authority.

 

If you want to install fittings such as a bath, WC, shower or washbasin within your home, or any other type of building, the Building Regulations will apply.

Building Regulations will also apply if the work involves installing an additional fitting or fittings.

If you want to install, or replace your bath with, a whirlpool or spa bath, the Building Regulations may apply.

 

Biomass Fuelled Appliances

Is not normally needed when installing a biomass system in a house if the work is all internal. If the installation requires a flue outside, however, it will normally be permitted development if the relevant conditions are met.

 

Building Regulations apply. You should take into account factors such as ventilation, noise and general safety.

Installation should be carried out by a suitably qualified installer. Building regulations also apply to other aspects of the work such as electrical installation and plumbing work.

 

Boilers and Heating

Is not normally required for installation or replacement of a boiler though if you live in a listed building you should check with your Local Planning Authority. will apply if you want to:

·         Install or replace a hot water cylinder

·         Install, replace or alter the position of any type of gas, solid fuel and oil appliances (including boilers)

·         Install a fixed, flueless, gas appliance

 

However, if you employ a registered installer with the relevant competencies to carry out the work on gas appliances, they should be able to self-certify the work without the need for close involvement of Building

Control.

 

Ceilings

– is not normally required for maintenance of ceilings though if you live in a listed building you should check with your Local Planning Authority.

 

Where more than 25 per cent of a ceiling below a cold loft space or flat roof is being replaced then the Building Regulations would normally apply, and the thermal insulation of that ceiling would normally have to be improved.

 

Circuits / Electrics

Is not normally required for maintenance/installation of electrics though if you live in a listed building you should check with your Local Planning Authority.

 

If you are carrying out electrical work in your home or garden in England and Wales, you will have to follow new rules in the Building Regulations.

 

You should use an installer who is registered with a competent person scheme or seek approval from a Building

Control Body. This is true for most work. However, you do not need to tell them about repairs, replacements and maintenance work or extra power points or lighting points or other alterations to existing circuits (except in a kitchen or bathroom, or outdoors).

Conservatories

A conservatory is treated exactly the same as any other extension under planning regulations, regardless of the materials used. From 1 October 2008 new rules apply to whether or not you can extend or add to your house without having to apply for planning permission. The new limits and conditions for what is allowed without the need for planning permission apply largely to the dimensions of the proposed addition, its position on the house and its proximity to your boundaries.

 

A conservatory built with a floor area of no more than 30m2 is normally exempt from the Building Regulations, provided that:

  • At least half of the new wall and three quarters of the roof is constructed from translucent material, e.g. glazing;
  • The conservatory is separated from the building by external quality doors, windows and walls;
  • Any glazing and fixed electrical installation complies with the applicable requirements of the Building Regulations (i.e. Part N – ‘Glazing’ and Part P – ‘Electrical Safety’).

Any new structural opening or the increased width of the original opening between the conservatory and the existing house will require approval.

Decking

Putting up decking, or other raised platforms, in your garden is permitted development providing they are no more than 30cm above the ground together with other extensions, outbuildings etc, they cover no more than 50 per cent of the garden area.

 

Building Regulations should be assumed to apply to every deck structure requiring planning permission. If you are unsure about whether you are required to comply, you may wish to contact your local Building Control body.

 

Decoration

is not normally required for internal decorations though if you live in a listed building you should check with your Local Planning Authority.

 

Any internal decorating such as wallpapering, new skirting boards or painting will not require a Building Regulations application.

 

Dormer Window

Whether or not you need planning permission for a dormer window or roof extension depends on a number of factors outlined in loft conversion advice.

 

Building Regulation approval is required to convert a loft or attic into a liveable space

Extensions and Additions

From 1 October 2008 you can extend or add to your home without the need to apply for planning permission provided you meet a new set of limits and conditions. The new regime for what is allowed without planning permission applies largely to the dimensions of the proposed extension, its position on the house and its proximity to your boundaries. You will also need to apply for planning permission if: You want to build an addition which would be nearer to any highway than the nearest part of the “original house” More than half the area of land around the “original house” would be covered by additions or other buildings.

 

Generally apply if you want to build an extension to your home. However, a porch or conservatory built at ground level and with a floor area of no more than 30m2 in floor area is normally exempt, provided that any glazing and any fixed electrical installation complies with the applicable requirements of the Building Regulations (i.e. Part N – ‘Glazing’ and Part P – ‘Electrical Safety’).

 

External Walls

You do not need to apply for planning permission for repairs, maintenance or minor improvements, such as painting your house.

If you live in a listed building, you will need listed building consent for any significant works whether internal or external. If you live in a Conservation Area, a National Park, an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty or the Broads, you will need to apply for planning permission before cladding the outside of your house with stone, tiles, artificial

stone, plastic or timber.

 

If you want to re-render or replace timber cladding to external walls, the Building Regulations may apply depending on the extent of the work.

 

Where 25 per cent or more of an external wall is re-rendered, re-clad, re-plastered or re-lined internally or where 25 per cent or more of the external leaf of a wall is rebuilt, the Regulations would normally apply and the thermal insulation would normally have to be improved. If you want to insert insulation into a cavity wall the Regulations will apply.

 

The appropriate requirements will be applied to ensure the insulation material is suitable, and that in the case of some foam insulants the risk of formaldehyde gas emission is assessed.

 

Fascia

Maintenance of the fascia such as replacement or painting generally does not require planning permission. However, if you live in a listed building or designated area (conservation area, national park, area of outstanding natural beauty, etc…) you should check with your local planning authority before carrying out any work.

 

The replacement of any fascia board or soffit will not normally require a Building Regulations application to be submitted.

 

If the existing system had vents installed then this will need to be maintained as they provide ventilation to the

roof.

 

Fences, Walls and Gates

You will need to apply for planning permission if you wish to erect or add to a fence, wall or gate and:

·         it would be over 1 metre high and next to a highway used by vehicles (or the footpath of such a highway);

·         or over 2 metres high elsewhere;

·         or your right to put up or alter fences, walls and gates is removed by an article 4 direction or a planning condition;

·         or your house is a listed building or in the curtilage of a listed building. the fence, wall or gate, or any other boundary involved, forms a boundary with a neighbouring listed building or its curtilage.

 

Fences, walls and gates do not require building regulation approval.  However, the structures must be structurally sound and maintained. If the garden wall is classes as a ‘party fence wall’ then you may have to notify the adjoining owner.

 

Floors

Planning Permission is not normally required for maintenance of floors though if you live in a listed building you should check with your Local Planning Authority.

 

If you are replacing or fitting a new floor building regulations would normally apply. Factors to consider include load bearing capacity, sound insulation and fire safety.

 

Flue, Chimney and Soil or Vent Pipes

Planning Permission – Fitting, altering or replacing a flue, chimney or soil and vent pipe will normally be permitted development, not requiring planning consent, providing certain rules and conditions are met.

 

Building Regulations – Part J of the Building Regulations seeks to ensure, among other things, that there is adequate provision for the discharge of the products of combustion to the outside air through flues that create enough draught, can take the expected temperatures, are sufficiently gas tight ,and discharge at locations away from openings into the building.

 

Flues and chimneys should be fixed in appropriate places.

Ventilation pipes should finish at least 900mm above any opening into the building within three metres.

 

Fuel Tanks

Planning Permission – Small domestic fuel tanks can normally be installed without planning permission.

However, permission will be required in certain circumstances. From 1 October 2008 permitted developments rights which apply for oil storage will include liquid petroleum gas.

 

If you live in a listed building you should check with your Local Planning Authority.

Building Regulations – The installation of a fuel tank should meet the necessary building regulations requirements. If the installation is above ground the requirements will be applied to achieve adequate shielding of the tank from any surrounding fire and containment of any leakage.

 

Garages

Garages can be built in your garden or on the land around your house without the need to apply for planning permission.  However, permission will be required in certain circumstances. If you live in a listed building you should check with your Local Planning Authority.

 

Construction of a garage attached to an existing home will normally require Building Regulations approval.

 

The construction of an attached carport (open on at least two sides) would not normally require approval if it has a floor area of no more than 30m2 (except in respect of electrical installations).

 

The construction of a detached garage would not normally require approval (except in respect of electrical

installations), if:

·         the floor area is no more than 15m2;

·         or the floor area is between 15m2 and 30m2 and the garage is at least one metre from any boundary,

·         or is constructed from substantially non-combustible materials.

Converting any garage into habitable use will normally require Building Regulations approval

Ground Source Heat Pump

Planning Permission – Installing a ground source heat pump system does not usually need planning permission. If you live in a listed building or a conservation area, however, you should contact your council to check on local policy.

 

Building Regulations – apply. Installation should be carried out by a suitably qualified installer. The equipment, installation and testing of the system must all comply with relevant standards detailed in the ‘Low or Zero Carbon Energy Sources: Strategic Guide (LZC)’ and ‘Domestic Heating Compliance Guide’. Building regulations also apply to other aspects of the work such as electrical installation and plumbing.

 

Insulation

Planning Permission – is not normally required for fitting insulation (where there is no change in external appearance). However, if the building is listed or is in a conservation area you should consult your local planning authority. Building Regulations – Insulation has to comply to the relevant building regulations both when installed during construction or when fitted retrospectively.

 

Internal Walls

Planning Permission – is not normally required for maintenance/creation of internal walls though if you live in a listed building you should check with your Local Planning Authority.

 

Building Regulations – If you wish to remove an internal wall, or form an opening in an internal wall, Building

Regulations will normally apply. Care should be taken before removing internal walls as these could have a number of functions that could affect the building and the safety of the occupants within a building.

 

Kitchen

Planning Permission – is not normally required for maintenance/replacement of a kitchen though if you live in a listed building you should check with your Local Planning Authority. Building Regulations – If you want to install fittings such as a kitchen sink within your home, or any other type of building, the Building Regulations will apply. Building Regulations will apply if the work involves installing an additional fitting or fittings.

 

Lighting (External)

Planning Permission – Light itself, and minor domestic light fittings, are not subject to planning controls.

Nevertheless, if you are planning to install external lighting for security or other purposes, you should ensure that the intensity and direction of light does not disturb others.

If you live in a listed building, you will need listed building consent for any significant works whether internal or

external.

 

Building Regulations – If you are carrying out electrical work and fixing lighting to the outside of your house in England and Wales, you will have to follow new building regulations rules.

You should either use an installer who is registered with the competent person scheme or make an application to your local authority’s building control department or approved inspectors.

 

Lighting (Internal)

Light itself, and minor domestic light fittings, are not subject to planning controls. Nevertheless, if you are planning to install external lighting for security or other purposes, you should ensure that the intensity and direction of light does not disturb others.

 

If you live in a listed building, you will need listed building consent for any significant works whether internal or

external.

 

If you are carrying out electrical work and installing lighting in your house then Building Regulations will apply.

 

However, repairs, replacements and maintenance work or extra lighting points or other alterations to existing circuits (except in a kitchen or bathroom, or outdoors) is allowed.

 

Loft Conversion

Planning Permission -is not normally required. However, permission is required where you extend the roof space and it exceeds specified limits and conditions. From 1 October 2008 new rules apply to whether or not you need to apply for planning permission to convert or alter your loft space.

 

Building Regulations -apply if you want to carry out a loft conversion to your home.

 

The appropriate requirements of the regulations will be applied to ensure, for example: the structural strength of the new floor is sufficient; the stability of the structure (including the existing roof) is not endangered; safe escape from fire; safely designed stairs to the new floor; and reasonable sound insulation between the conversion and the rooms below.

 

You will also need to consider whether your loft conversion project is subject to The Party Wall etc. Act 1996 under which you must give adjoining owners notice.

There are also some special rules associated with ground floor open plan properties and it is suggested that you get specific advice from building control before considering your loft conversion as to the suitability and options you have for fire protection.

Maintaining Drainpipes

Planning Permission – You do not usually need to apply for planning permission for repairs or maintenance. Occasionally, you may need to apply for planning permission for some of these works because your council has made an Article 4 Direction withdrawing permitted development rights.

Soil and vent pipe will also normally be permitted development providing certain rules and conditions are met.

If you live in a listed building, you will need listed building consent for any significant works whether internal or external.

 

Building Regulations – If you wish to repair or replace an existing drainpipe, manhole or associated fitting, approval under the Building Regulations is not normally required if the replacement is like for like.

 

However, the provision of a new drainpipe, manhole or associated fitting will normally require approval under

the Building Regulations.

 

They will apply to new rainwater or foul drains inside as well as outside the building. The Building Regulations also apply to all non-mains foul sewerage arrangements (i.e. those using septic tanks), including their outlets

and drainage fields.

 

Ventilation pipes should finish at least 900mm above any opening into the building within three metres.

 

Manhole and Drains

Planning Permission – Although the work itself may not require planning permission you should clarify ownership and responsibility before modifying or carrying out maintenance.

 

Drains, sewers and manholes may be shared with neighbours or owned by the relevant water authority. Failure to confirm these details or to comply with relevant standards/legislation could lead to legal and remedial action at your own cost.

 

Building Regulations – If you wish to repair or replace an existing drainpipe, manhole or associated fitting, approval under the Building Regulations is not normally required if the replacement is like for like.

 

However, the provision of a new drainpipe, manhole or associated fitting will normally require approval under

the Building Regulations.

 

They will apply to new rainwater or foul drains inside as well as outside the building. The Building Regulations also apply to all non-mains foul sewerage arrangements (i.e. those using septic tanks), including their outlets and drainage fields.

 

Micro-Combined Heat and Power

Planning Permission -is not normally needed when installing a micro-CHP system in a house if the work is all internal. If the installation requires a flue outside, however, it will normally be permitted development if the relevant conditions are met.

 

Building Regulations – The equipment, installation and testing of a micro-CHP system must all comply with relevant standards set out in full in the ‘Low or Zero Carbon Energy Sources: Strategic Guide (LZC)’.

 

Building regulations also apply to other aspects of the work such as electrical installation and plumbing work.

 

Party Wall

Not applicable, see Party Wall Act 1996 Building Regulations – Some kinds of work carried out to a property may not be building work that is controlled by the Building Regulations, but may be work which is covered by the Party Wall etc. Act 1996 – which is a separate piece of legislation with different aims.

 

There will be some instances where both the Party Wall etc. Act and the Building Regulations apply to the work

being carried out. You must find out whether work you intend to carry out falls within The Party Wall etc. Act 1996.

 

Patios + Driveways and Hardstanding

Planning Permission – From 1 October 2008 new rules will apply to paving over your front garden. Elsewhere around your house there are no restrictions on the area of land which you can cover with hard surfaces at, or near, ground level. However, significant works of embanking or terracing to support a hard surface might need a planning

application.

 

If you live in a listed building, you will need listed building consent for any significant works whether internal or

external.

 

Building Regulations – Generally a new driveway or patio area does not require building regulations approval. However, you will need to make sure that any alterations do not make access to the dwelling any less satisfactory than it was before.

 

Paving your Front Garden

Planning permission – From 1 October 2008 new rules apply for householders wanting to pave over their front

gardens. You will not need planning permission if a new driveway of any size uses permeable (or porous) surfacing, such as gravel, permeable concrete block paving or porous asphalt, or if the rainwater is directed to a lawn or border

to drain naturally.

 

If the surface to be covered is more than five square metres planning permission will be needed for laying

traditional, impermeable driveways that do not control rainwater running off onto roads.

 

Building Regulations – do not generally apply. However, you will need to make sure that any alterations do not make access to the dwelling any less satisfactory than it was before.

So, for example, changing levels to introduce steps where none existed before would be a contravention of the

regulations.

 

Porches

Planning Permission – You will need to apply for planning permission if the porch:

·         would have a ground area (measured externally) of more than 3 square metres;

·         would be higher than 3 metres above ground level (height needs to be measured in the same way as

·         for a house extension); or

·         would be less than 2 metres away from the boundary of a dwelling house with a highway (which includes all public roads, footpaths, bridleways and byways).

 

Building Regulations – The construction of a porch built at ground level with a floor area of no more than 30m2 is normally exempt from Building Regulations approval, provided that any glazing and fixed electrical installation complies with the applicable requirements of the Building Regulations (i.e. Part N ‘Glazing’ and Part P ‘Electrical

safety’).

 

In addition, for a porch to be exempt from Building Regulations approval, the front entrance door between the existing house and the new porch must remain in place, and where the house has ramped or level access for disabled people, it is essential that the porch must not adversely affect the access.

 

Radiators

Planning Permission – is not normally required for installation or replacement of radiators though if you live in a listed building you should check with your Local Planning Authority.

 

Building Regulations – If a heating system or hot water system is to be replaced then an application may not be required, and, if it is required, it may not be necessary to apply in advance of carrying out the work.

 

Roof

Planning Permission – You do not normally need to apply for planning permission to replace or maintain your roof or to insert roof lights or skylights. New rules covering what is allowed without planning permission come into force on 1 October 2008. If additional volume is created it may be treated as an extension and separate rules will apply (see ‘Loft conversion’).

If you live in a listed building or designated area (conservation area, national park, Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, etc…) you should check with your local planning authority before carrying out any work.

 

Building Regulations – If you want to carry out repairs to, or to recover, less than 25 per cent of the surface area of a pitched or flat roof you will not normally require Building Regulations approval, unless you carry out any of the following works:

·         use a new covering material which increases the weight of the roof covering by 15 per cent or more;

·         structural alterations;

·         use a new covering that will have a significantly different performance to that of the existing covering in the

·         event of a fire.

If you are replacing/repairing more than 25 per cent of the roof area, the thermal insulation to the roof would normally have to be improved so you would need to submit an application.

 

Roof Window

Planning Permission – Insertion of a roof window generally does not require planning permission if, in the council’s view, it does not project significantly beyond the roof slope.

However, if additional volume is created it may be treated as an extension and separate rules will apply.

If you live in a listed building or designated area (conservation area, national park, area of outstanding natural beauty, etc…) you should check with your local planning authority before carrying out any work.

 

Building Regulations – If you would like to install a roof light or roof window, then Building Regulations are likely to apply for the following reasons:

·         to install a roof light the roof structure will generally need to be altered to create the opening;

·         the roof will have to be able to carry the load (weight) of the new roof light, if the roof cannot do this,

·         then it will need to be strengthened;

·         any window that is installed will need to prove that it has sufficient insulation against heat loss (i.e. it is energy efficient).

Where a roof light is replaced, Building Regulations approval will be required.

 

Satellite Dishes, Aerials and Antennae

Planning Permission – Normal domestic TV and radio aerials do not need planning permission.

In certain circumstances, you will need to apply for planning permission to install a satellite dish on your house.

Remember, you are responsible for the appropriate siting of satellite dishes.

 

Building Regulations – do not generally apply but you should take care that the installation is safe and the fixing point stable.

 

Security Alarm

Planning Permission – is not normally required for installing a security alarm, though if you live in a listed building or conservation area you should check with your Local Planning Authority.

 

Building Regulations – Installing a security alarm system should not be captured by the building regulations. However, the electrical work required will need to comply with the relevant standards

 

Sheds

Planning Permission – Many kinds of buildings and structures can be built in your garden or on the land around your house without the need to apply for planning permission.

However, in some circumstances, you will need to apply for planning permission and from 1 October 2008 a new regime of limits and conditions for permitted development comes into force.

In some circumstances, you will need to apply for planning permission.

 

Building Regulations – If you want to put up small detached buildings, such as a garden shed or summerhouse, in your garden, the Building Regulations will not normally apply if the floor area of the building is no more than 15m2.

If the floor area of the building is between 15m2 and 30m2, you will not normally be required to apply for Building Regulations approval provided that the building is either at least 1m from any boundary or it is constructed of substantially non combustible materials.

In both cases, Building Regulations will not apply only if the building does not contain any sleeping accommodation.

 

Smoke Alarms

Planning Permission – is not normally required for installing a smoke alarm, though if you live in a listed building or conservation area you should check with your Local Planning Authority. Building Regulations – If you are building a loft conversion, extension or altering the layout of your home building regulations (Part B Fire Safety) would normally apply.

Building Regulations now require the installation of automatic smoke detectors to all new dwellings and loft conversions.

 

Advice should be taken on the type of smoke alarm(s) to be fitted, positioning and installation.

 

Solar Panel (Ground Based)

Planning Permission – Installing solar panels domestically should not usually require an application for planning permission so long as the conditions and limits are met.

 

You should also consider your location and the positioning of panels to maximise the amount of energy generated.

 

If you live in a listed building or designated area (conservation area, national park, area of outstanding natural beauty, etc…) you should check with your local planning authority before carrying out any work.

 

Building Regulations – Energy efficiency work may also be carried out mostly without the need for Building Regulations approval.

 

However, building regulations also apply to other aspects of the work such as electrical installation. It is advisable to contact an installer who can provide the necessary advice.

 

Solar Panels (Roof Mounted)

Planning Permission – In many cases fixing solar panels to the roof of a single dwelling house is likely to be considered ‘permitted development’ under planning law with no need to apply for planning permission.

 

There are, however, important exceptions and provisos which must be observed.

 

Building Regulations – If you wish to install a solar panel on your roof building regulations will normally apply.

The ability of the existing roof to carry the load (weight) of the panel will need to be checked and proven. Some strengthening work may be needed.

 

Building regulations also apply to other aspects of the work such as electrical installation. It is advisable to contact an installer who can provide the necessary advice.

 

Trees and Hedgerows

Planning Permission – Many trees are protected by tree preservation orders which mean that, in general, you need the council’s consent to prune or fell them.

In addition, there are controls over many other trees in conservation areas and other designated areas.

 

If you plan to remove a hedgerow you may also require consent. If you are in any doubt about the status of the trees or hedgerows you plan to work on should contact your local council before you start.

 

Not applicable for Building Regulations

Underpinning and Foundations

Planning Permission – Planning permission is not normally required for work to maintain foundations though if you live in a listed building you should check with your Local Planning Authority. Building Regulations – If you need to underpin all or part of the foundations to your building, the Building Regulations will apply.

 

The regulations specifically define this as ‘Building Work’.

The appropriate requirements will be applied so as to ensure that the underpinning will stabilise the movement of the building.

 

Particular regard will need to be given to the effect on any sewers and drains near the work.

 

Unimproved Loft Space

Planning Permission – Boarding out your loft for storage does not require planning permission. Building Regulations – In most homes, the timber joists that form the ‘floor’ of the loft space will not have been designed to support a significant weight

 

If you decide to lay flooring boards over the existing joists in the loft space, this may require a Building Regulations Application to Building Control. Your local Building Control body will be able to advise you on this issue.

 

Windows and Doors

Planning Permission – You do not usually need to apply for planning permission for repairs, maintenance or minor improvements, such as painting frames or replacing windows; the insertion of windows, skylights or roof lights (though a new bay window will be treated as an extension).

Occasionally, you may need to apply for planning permission for some of these works because your council has made an Article 4 Direction withdrawing permitted development rights. If you live in a listed building, you will need listed building consent for any significant works – internal or external.

 

Building Regulations – If you replace a window(s) in your home, or any other type of building, the Building Regulations:

·         will normally apply if you are replacing the whole of the fixed frame and opening parts or creating new openings for windows or doors;

·         will not normally apply if the work amounts to no more than, for example, replacing broken glass, rotten sashes or rotten sections of the main frame members.

·         Replacement of external doors with 50 per cent glazing or more will require approval.

For replacement windows and glazed doors, if the contractor carrying out the work is registered with one of the three self-certification schemes, then you would not need to make an application.

 

Wind Turbines (Wall / Roof Mounted)

Planning Permission – Currently, installing a wind turbine at your home will usually require planning permission regardless of the size of the turbine.

 

Visual impact and noise are the two most common issues that should be considered in any location.

 

You should also consider the average wind speeds in your area and how surrounding structures, trees, topographical features and the turbine’s position would affect its ability to generate energy.

 

Building Regulations – may apply to wind turbines attached to buildings. However, the use of wind turbines and other micro generation systems are encouraged but must demonstrate compliance with Part L, Part A (Structural safety) and Part P (Electrical safety). A building notice will need to be submitted to the local authority.